Git subtree cheatsheet

I needed a cheatsheet for some common commands I use day-to-day with git subtree. I don't intend this to be a full overview of how to use subtree, more just a reference for myself and anyone else interested.

An OS X Drupal development environment with Homebrew

This is a collection of notes I took while setting up a Drupal-ready Apache / MySQL / PHP environment on OS X using Homebrew and PEAR / PECL. I believe it should work to recreate an environment from scratch, but I've not run through the notes from start to finish on a fresh environment to validate. Hopefully this will help you get your own environment up and running easily!

Note: Mark Sonnabaum's Megalodon might be of interest to you, as well. For me, it involved learning a few too many things, and I also wanted as much as possible in my environment to be handled via a package manager like Homebrew or PEAR.

Update: Per Mark, Megalodon does entirely use Homebrew and Chef, I just misunderstood it. I look forward to seeing what I can do with it, once I dig in and understand it a bit more.

Update: Thanks, @stevepurkiss, for pointing out the typo on the first line for brew tap... That's been fixed!

Update: Thanks, @cashwilliams, for pointing out some issues with the my.cnf and order of packages being installed. I've updated a couple of the instructions below to reflect his findings.

Update: I've added instructions for initial setup of Drupal coding standards for PHP Code Sniffer.

Sending email on OS X from localhost via an ISP

For a while now I've noticed that when I'm at home doing Drupal development, emails from my local development environment don't get sent. Then, I'll get somewhere else and - all of the sudden - all the backed-up emails will get sent out. I figured out that it's because my localhost had to be configrued to send the email via my Internet service provider's SMTP server. In my case, the ISP is Cox. I was able to make a quick configuration change, and now things are working great.

Upgrading to Emacs 23.2 on Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid)

I've been frustrated at the lack of an update for the Emacs package in Ubuntu 10.04. I've been using Emacs 23.2 for OSX and going back-and-forth between 23.2 and 23.1 is confusing, particularly in org-mode. So, I searched for how to effectively build Emacs 23.2 from source in Ubuntu and had trouble finding good instructions that would cover me for things like windowing, fonts, etc. Finally, in my search this morning, I came across a the Ubuntu Emacs Lisp project on Launchpad.

I got a job at Acquia!

Just over 6 years ago I joined ASU's University Technology Office as a young and admittedly very inexperienced developer. I was fortunate enough to spend the time since then working for folks with foresight and strategic vision that I've only recently started to appreciate. I've also been blessed to have been involved with projects that I feel proud to say are changing the face of education. In short, I've loved my work at ASU more than my clumsy writing can describe here.

How I build an Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Drupal Development VM in VirtualBox

A development virtual machine can be really handy. It gives you a sandbox of sorts where you can feel free to test and experiment knowing that in a worst-case scenario you can just delete the VM and start over. It can also be a great way to practice server configurations and sketch out "real-world" server setups. Here's the process I follow to setup my Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Drupal development VM in VirtualBox. Aside from the VM-specific steps, these instructions should work for a regular Ubuntu server (VM or not).

Decoder Ring: a framework for collaborative language research

This spring, I wrapped up my masters degree in Educational Technology at Arizona State University. In my studies, I had the great pleasure of working with some of the trailblazing academics in the field of educational language, literacy, and gaming studies. Among the folks I've interacted with over the last several years, James Paul Gee and Elisabeth Hayes have overwhelmingly influenced my interests in academic research in the field. Guided by their seminars and publications, along with many others, including Sean Duncan and Constance Steinkuehler, I developed a strong interest in utilizing my web application development skills to create tools that further the field of academic research in language and literacy.

Last fall, I started in earnest on a project to do just that and, to make a long story very short, the ultimate result is Decoder Ring, which I've just presented at the 2010 Games, Learning & Society Conference. Decoder Ring is a web-based, collaborative language analysis tool designed for academic research of textual content. It features:

  • Abstracted, flexible, powerful data model
  • Sustainable, low cost, open source framework
  • Project- and group-based to facilitate collaboration
  • Tools for gathering (scraping), importing, browsing, and exporting large data sets
  • Automated and extensible reporting tools

DrupalCon San Francisco 2010 Presentation: Drupal at ASU - Slides and video

I recently presented a session titled Case Studies in Academia: Drupal at ASU & Johns Hopkins Knowledge for Health at DrupalCon San Francisco 2010. The presentation went really well. It was great to meet with all the other universities that are using Drupal and talk about the wildly varying ways Drupal is being used in academia.

Rewrite Amazon product links using jQuery, RegEx and PHP

Over at Gamers With Jobs we wanted to rewrite any outbound Amazon product links so that they include the GWJ affiliate ID (every little bit counts when you're a community site). Deciphering Amazon's generally bloated URLs can be tricky, as can knowing what exactly is required when building a link to a product page. So, I cobbled together a couple different pieces of info into a pretty simple solution that I thought I'd share.

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